Trade in your old tripod & how it works.

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Yes, we take old tripods on trade in.  Is it worth it?

  1. We recycle old tripods that are not salvagable, so very little other than plastic and rubber goes into the land fill.
  2. It does cost you money to ship it to us, but you get a newer tripod, with a new warranty, for less than you could buy it for, including the shipping.
  3. Having the correct tools improves your work.  Less time improvising or making non-standard parts work, messing around with an inadequate piece of crap…

Click Here for an estimated credit value list.  These are only estimates, and actual value is based on condition once we receive it.

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Make money from your old gear.

This October 13th and 14th we will be making trades in the store.  Trade in’s brought in or delivered on or before that day will also be eligible for trade in credits from Manfrotto on their New tripods and heads.  In some cases, the trade in incentives and specials from the Trade In & Trade Up day will make select tripods up to HALF OFF, or more.

 

I Cleaned Out my Video Head And Now It’s Not Panning Smooth – What Do I Do?

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It all depends upon where you cleaned.  It is common for dirt and grime to accumulate in the cracks and grooves. This by itself is often the problem, especially if the dirt is gritty like sand. If you disassembled the head and cleaned out the grease from the bearings, then they will need to be relubed.  The picture is of the 128RC video head.  The bearing stack is a common feature in many of the older video heads.  Make sure the bearings are clean and lubed with a bit (not too much) on silicon or lithium grease.

Damaged fluid disk assembly

Damaged fluid disk assembly

If you went even farther and cleaned out the fluid disks then you will need to relube those as well.  Normally the disks are filled with a type of grease that provides the smooth movements in this head.  If the disks are separated (as below) or the grease is removed (also as below) then they are mostly worthless.  You can purchase a jar of the grease here, or the discs are available with each head that takes them.

Disassembled fluid disks

Disassembled fluid disks

The disks are not interchangeable between models. So be careful when you are working with these.  Also the grease is unlike any grease you’ve probably ever come in contact with.  It is sticky and gooey and not something that is easily cleaned up.  We never recommend taking these disks apart.

If you have problems,  click here to return the parts to us for reassembly.

If you are having problems, or for a tune up or for repairs, send your name, address, daytime phone and email address along with your tripod to:

ManfrottoTripodParts.com Repairs
c/o SpartanPhotoCenter
108 Garner Road
Spartanburg, SC 29303

Once we have it, we will evaluate it and contact you. Please send us your daytime phone so we can reach you during business hours.

Lastly, if we are repairing your Manfrotto Product; we are recycling all broken parts and scrap articles. Almost nothing goes into the trash if we can help it.

Free Quick Release With Manfrotto Head Purchase

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Free Quick Release

Free Quick Release

For the next 2 weeks, any head purchased will come with a FREE quick release plate.  Click Here to put the Free Plate in your cart.  This special applies to any Manfrotto Head that uses a quick release plate.

Choose from among these popular heads:

322RC2 Head

322RC2 Head

322RC2 Quick Action Ball Head
Single action control allows you full control over pan, tilt and vertical shift.  It can be made into a left or right handed grip.  Built in bubble level and 3 leveling positions.  This head is able to hold small and large setups.  Personally we routinely use it with a Nikon D4 with a 70-200mm f2.8 lens, which weighs about 8 lbs.  This head uses the 200PL quick release, which is the most common Manfrotto quick release.

Ball head

496RC2 Ball head

496RC2 Ballhead.
Uses the 200PL quick release for easy adaptability amongst other Manfrotto heads.  The is a ball head with pan lock, tilt/swivel lock and a third knob for tension.  the tension knob allows you to add more drag the ball or panning action to control the amount of movement you need.  No more quick jerky movements.  While not like a fluid video head, this ball is much smoother than previous versions.

Manfrotto Ball Head MH054M0-Q6

Manfrotto Ball Head MH054M0-Q6

The MH054M0-Q6 uses Manfrottos newer MS6 quick release, that is also ARCA  compatible. This is one of the top heads with a large ball to support extra heavy loads up to 22lbs; while the head itself only weighs about 1.5 lbs.  There are plenty of features on this head as well: bubble level above the ball, pan and ball lock are independent, tension control independent from the locks, degree number on the pan plate for panoramas.

Of course there are the new heads: the MHXPRO 3Way and MHX PRO 2 Way heads.

If you have any questions about which head you would like, or need, please feel free to call us at 864-699-9333 for our sale line.

If you are having problems, or for a tune up or for repairs, send your name, address, daytime phone and email address along with your tripod to:

ManfrottoTripodParts.com Repairs
c/o SpartanPhotoCenter
108 Garner Road
Spartanburg, SC 29303

Once we have it, we will evaluate it and contact you. Please send us your daytime phone so we can reach you during business hours.

Lastly, if we are repairing your Manfrotto Product; we are recycling all broken parts and scrap articles. Almost nothing goes into the trash if we can help it.

Why doesn’t my head lock? It moves a little bit even though everything is locked down!

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separation

Loose Head

This is actually a very simple fix.  On most Manfrotto Tripods, the head is removable.  Over time or heavy use, the connection between the head and the tripod will loosen up a little bit.  It may not unscrew more than a little bit that is mostly unnoticeable, because there are locking screws that are supposed to keep the head from moving are stopping it.

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Grub Screw on Manfrotto tripod

So, raise the center column as far up as it will go.  Look under the head.  There you should see at least one or as many as three “grub screws.”  These are slotted screws that when tightened lock the head to the tripod and keep it from moving.  To repair the problem… just back out the grub screws a little bit.  Then unscrew the head and then re-tighten it.  Re-tighten the grub screws and Voila!  You are done.

Please remember: DO NOT USE finger nail polish or Loc-tite on the head or grub screws to “lock” them in place.  You may make it impossible to repair this head again in the future.

Also be aware: There are several variations of these spare parts.  Older style for number models like 055 or 190. Find it here. The newer style for lettered models like MT055 or MT190  are found here.

If you are having problems, or for a tune up or for repairs, send your name, address, daytime phone and email address along with your tripod to:

ManfrottoTripodParts.com Repairs
c/o SpartanPhotoCenter
108 Garner Road
Spartanburg, SC 29303

Once we have it, we will evaluate it and contact you. Please send us your daytime phone so we can reach you during business hours.

Lastly, if we are repairing your Manfrotto Product; we are recycling all broken parts and scrap articles. Almost nothing goes into the trash if we can help it.

Post was changed to reflect the address change

How to Change a Head

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Changing most Manfrotto heads is easy.  On those tripods that have heads that can be removed you just look for the locking screws below the head, but above the center column post.

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Grub Screws shown locking head to Manfrotto Tripod

The tripod on the left has three locking screws, while some may only one.

You only need to loosen the locking screws and while looking down at the head, turn it counter clockwise. You may have to tighten the panning knob extra tight so the head doesn’t just pan, instead of unscrew.  Also, if the head has been on a long time a quick, firm tap with the palm of your hand to jar loose the head may be needed.  Shouldn’t take a lot of force.  If it does, you may need to completely remove the lock screws.

Never use a hammer to beat on the head, this will deform the parts, and make it impossible to remove.

Remember to NEVER use fingernail polish or Loc-Tite to set the screw after you put the new head on;  you may never get the head off after that, and we may not either.

If you are having problems, or for a tune up or for repairs, send your name, address, daytime phone and email address along with your tripod to:

ManfrottoTripodParts.com Repairs
c/o SpartanPhotoCenter
108 Garner Road
Spartanburg, SC 29303

Once we have it, we will evaluate it and contact you.  Please send us your daytime phone so we can reach you during business hours.

Lastly, if we are repairing your Manfrotto Product; we are recycling all broken parts and scrap articles.  Almost nothing goes into the trash if we can help it.

 

Post was changed to reflect the address change